Basic Research

The Science, Technology, Innovation Exchange (STIx) is meant to communicate the big ideas, positive social impacts, and disruptive capabilities that have resulted from DoD S&T investments. This series of short videos features talks in fields of science, technology, and STEM, are presented by DoD and DoD sponsored participants, from across the Department and that span careers from graduate students to senior researchers.

 

These in-depth stories were developed to raise awareness about the importance of Defense laboratories, engineering centers, and warfare centers as unique catalysts for innovation as well as showcase the critical work they perform. By sharing stories about the people and institutions behind science and technology, DoD STEM aims to increase interest in STEM careers.

 

Dr. Aude Oliva, "The Time Machine in Your Head"

The human brain is a time machine: we are constantly remembering our past and projecting ourselves in time and space in the future. Neuroscientists are explorers who study how the time machine works, how to repair it when it is damaged, and how to improve it.

Military Branch: 
DoD Supported
Subject Area: 
Functional Biology, Physical Science

Dr. Charles Kamhoua, "Cyber Physical Security Game"

Cyber Physical Systems (CPS) and Internet of Things (IoT) devices such as sensors, wearable devices, robots, drones, and autonomous vehicles, facilitate the Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance to Command and Control and battlefield services. The capability of such systems to autonomously secure themselves is a key foundation for operational resilience but the extensive use of information and communication technologies in such systems makes them vulnerable to cyber-attacks.

Military Branch: 
Army, DoD Supported
Subject Area: 
Social Science, Technology

Dr. John Rogers, "Transient Electronics"

A remarkable feature of modern integrated circuit technology is its ability to operate, almost indefinitely, in a stable, reliable fashion, without physical or chemical change. Recently developed classes of electronic materials create an opportunity to engineer the opposite outcome, in the form of devices that dissolve, in a controlled fashion, completely and harmlessly in groundwater or biofluids.

Military Branch: 
DoD Supported
Subject Area: 
Engineering, Technology

Dr. Raychelle Burks, "Catching Students at STEM Intersections"

Research in applied science often captures and holds student attention because they’re working on relatable “real world” problems. Students, however, might need advanced skills to work on applied projects. To address this Catch-22, students in my lab work on intersecting projects.

Military Branch: 
DoD Supported
Subject Area: 
Applied Science, Mathematics, Chemistry, Technology

Mr. Ralph Tillinghast, "Maintaining the workforce of today, while building the workforce of 2040"

The need for increasing interest and appreciation for the STEM disciplines is required for the US to maintain its continued lead in the global market. This is of great importance for the DoD, where hiring US citizens is required. For this reason, the Picatinny STEM office was established over 10 years ago to identify, nurture, recruit, and retain Science and Engineering (S&E) professionals.

Military Branch: 
Army, DoD Supported
Subject Area: 
Applied Science, Engineering, Formal Science, Life Science, Physical Science, Social Science, Technology